A Brief History of Proxima Nova


Proxima Nova (2005) is a clean, crisp, and modern typeface that continues to be a go-to font for me in my design work. I started wondering, just what was the story behind this font?  Here is what I found:

proxima-nova

Proxima Nova font is one of the latest incarnation of a typeface family Mark Simonson has been working on for over 30 years. The first sketches were made around 1981. At that time, he called it Zanzibar, mainly because he liked the word.

Zanzibar had much of the basic structure and appearance of Proxima Nova, especially in the lowercase. In 1991, Mark was art director of a magazine in which he was using Gill Sans. He liked it a lot, but wished there was something plainer and more geometric. Such a face did not seem to exist.

Taking this basic concept and the earlier ideas for Zanzibar, he began working on a new typeface, which he dubbed Visigothic. Many existing fonts influenced the look of Visigothic. Mark wanted something with the general proportions and stroke contrast of Helvetica or Akzidenz Grotesk, but with construction principles and details borrowed variously from Futura, Kabel, the aTF gothics and the U.S. Federal Highway signage typeface.

The result was a hybrid; a face combining modern, even-width proportions with a somewhat geometric appearance. It was released through FontHaus in 1994 as Proxima Sans, a family of six fonts—three weights with matching italics. The name Visigothic was dropped because of its similarity to the name of another recently released font, Visigoth, and because Mark felt it was just a bit too corny.

The name Proxima Sans was chosen to acknowledge that it was near other sans serifs in design and also because the letters in the name displayed some of the more identifiable characteristics of the design.

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50 Beautifully Designed Book Covers for Inspiration


Via OnExtraPixel.com

Books displayed on a shelf in a shop need to attract prospective buyers, and the first and most important way that can be done is with an eye-catching cover design. Whether it is very significant to the content of the book, or completely ‘off the wall’ in its design, it is what is going to make people pick the book up and read the back cover.

There are many articles advising designers to look around them and to look everywhere for inspiration, and perhaps some do walk into bookshops and browse the book and magazine cover designs, but I am guessing most don’t often have either the time or the inclination to do that, so today we are bringing you a collection of beautifully designed book covers for your inspiration – some new, some old, and in many and varying styles of design, just like browsing a book store.

50 Beautifully Designed Book Covers for Inspiration

Beautifully Designed Book Covers for Inspiration

Empire Rising
Empire Rising

Wall Street
Wall Street

And Then There’s This
And Then There's This

Exit A
Exit A

Triangular Road
Triangular Road

Super Sad True Love Story
Super Sad True Love Story

Uncommon Sense
Uncommon Sense

 SEE MORE >

The Most Versatile


The 20 most versatile font families

via CreativeBloq

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Finding just the right typography for a project is a classic conundrum for a designer. Do you go all out for something unique to give the piece real character, or is it better to opt for something neutral and classic that doesn’t overwhelm the rest of the design?

In order to be both versatile and consistent within a project, without becoming repetitive, it helps if a typeface includes an extensive family of fonts that cover different styles, weights and widths – this also takes the sting out of pairing complementary typefaces.

The notion of an extended, organised type family (or ‘superfamily’ if it contains different classifications too, such as a serif and a sans serif) is a relatively new concept, and has only been around as we know it today for just over a century – but nowadays there are plenty to choose from. We’ve rounded up 20 of the best to help with all manner of design projects.

Check out the full list…

Hamilton Type Museum Likely to Be Evicted!


Just a few days after the Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum‘s annual Wayzgoose type conference in Two Rivers, Wisconsin, Bill Moran, the museum’s artistic director, announced that the invaluable repository of typographic history will likely be evicted from an original Hamilton building that dates to 1926. “We don’t know where we’re moving to and we don’t know how we’re going to get there,” he told me.

Read more at Imprint: Help Save the Hamilton Wood Type Museum

Donate here to save the Wood Type Museum!

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via Imprint Magazine

Type Threads


Type meets thread in a new trend for hand-stitched typography

Handmade typography with paper and set design is becoming popular amongst creatives working in all fields for the last few years. Few, however, have taken to stitching. One such illustrator who experiments with type and thread is Peter Crawley, his January piece being a good example of what’s possible with the often frowned upon medium.

Another illustrator experimenting with thread and craft is Australian Dominique Falla. Her work for Wired where she illustrated the logo using nails and string being particularly cool.

Read more: The hottest typography design trends for 2012 http://www.dnjg.be/wordpress/2012/08/27/the-hottest-typography-design-trends-for-2012/#ixzz2C75iK3h3